EU Parliament Proposes Amendments to RRD

On 5 February 2013, the EU Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs published a draft opinion proposing certain amendments to the ‘proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing a framework for the recovery and resolution of credit institutions and investment firms’ (the “RRD”).  The draft opinion is very short and the proposed amendments most worthy of note are detailed below.

Recital 18 of the RRD currently refers to the ability of less systemically important firms to produce “simplified” resolution plans.  The Legal Affairs Committee proposes to amend this reference so that resolution planning is “proportionate” to systemic relevance.  However, to date, there appear to be no consequential changes to Article 4 which deals with “simplified” recovery and resolution obligations for less systemically important firms.

Article 5 of the RRD includes an ability for regulators to require institutions to update recovery plans more frequently than annually.  In a welcome development, the proposed amendment would only allow this to happen if it were “necessary for the stability of the financial markets” so as to avoid needlessly burdening firms with red tape.

Article 78 of the RRD enables any person affected by a decision of a resolution authority to take a resolution action to apply for judicial review of that decision.  However, as currently drafted, notwithstanding the right to apply for judicial review, the actual decision of the resolution authority is “immediately enforceable and shall not be subject to a suspension order issued by a court”.  The Committee on Legal Affairs proposes to delete this caveat.  The justification for this proposal is that it is not appropriate to restrict a court’s right to suspend resolution actions if breaches of rules are detected.  Whilst understandable in principle, the reality is that, by the very nature of resolution itself, one or more parties are always likely to feel aggrieved following the initiation of resolution action.  This amendment does not seek to restrict itself to ‘breaches of rules’ and the lack of certainty it would introduce into the resolution process risks creating problems of a higher order than those it seeks to cure.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s