EBA Responds to EU Commission’s Consultation on RRP for Non-Banks

On 21 December 2012, the European Banking Authority (EBA) published its response to the EU Commission’s “Consultation on a Possible Recovery and Resolution Framework for Financial Institutions Other Than Banks”.

In general, the EBA believes it important that RRP regimes should be harmonised so as to avoid regulatory arbitrage across borders and between industries such as banking and insurance.  Clear guidance should also be provided on the circumstances and extent to which FMIs which also hold banking licences will be subject to bank or non-bank resolution proposals.  Ultimately, it may be necessary to extend the non-bank RRP proposals to include ‘shadow banking’ entities such as money market funds and hedge funds.

The EBA agrees that the objectives of a resolution regime for FMIs should be aligned with those of banks, namely the continuation of critical functions and the maintenance of financial stability.  Cross-border co-ordination in the form of supervisory Resolution Colleges should also be encouraged.

With respect to resolution tools, the EBA supports the proposal concerning the transfer of critical functions of a failing FMI to a surviving FMI.  In order to facilitate such a transfer, the EBA suggests that ex-ante operational arrangements between FMIs should be established and specifically endorses the actions referred to in the FSB “Key Attributes” paper, namely:

  • A centralised repository for all FMI membership agreements;
  • Standardised documentation for payment services;
  • Draft transition services agreement; and
  • A ‘purchasers’ pack’ including key information on payment operations and credit exposures, and lists of key staff.

With respect to loss-allocation tools, specifically the haircutting of margin held on behalf of clearing members of a failing FMI, the EBA believes that more consideration should be given to the specific circumstances of the clearing member and their ability to actually absorb losses so as to avoid the possibility of financial contagion.  Moreover, any loss-allocation mechanism which goes beyond normal pre-funded loss mutualisation measures (i.e. the guarantee fund) should be closely coordinated with authorities responsible for the supervision and oversight of the clearing members.

On the subject of group resolution of FMIs, the EBA is of the opinion that any recovery and resolution framework should aim to maintain the ‘healthy’ parts of the FMI in question.  In order to protect these ‘healthy’ parts, it may be necessary to wind up or even ‘tear up clearing’ of specific instruments.  In addition, it may be prudent to allow for one part of an FMI group to provide temporary financial support to an FMI in difficulty, provided that this does not risk contagion or involve lending to an insolvent entity.

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